(165 votes, average: 2.36 out of 5)
Logo Of The Day Award Winner:

2009-09-16 | Eighty 20

Eighty-20 is a small consulting company which does sophisticated financial modeling, as well as some solid database work. All their work is highly quantitative and relies on some serious computational power, and the logo is meant to convey it. People first guess that 20% of the squares are darkened, but that turns out to be false after counting them. The trick is to view the dark squares as 1’s and the light squares as 0’s. Then the top line reads 1010000 and the bottom line reads 0010100, which represent 80 and 20 in binary.” Source

Credits: Unknown


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18 Comments to “2009-09-16 | Eighty 20”

tarpon
Sep 16, 2009 at 1:49 pm

i dunno, 99% of all people are not computer geeks, so you might as well have picked Chinese characters to represent 80/20. The concept is a little complicated for normal folks to figure out, which kind of defeats the main purpose of a logo.


 
nichocreativo
Sep 16, 2009 at 1:50 pm

I like it! Very simple, a little colors. I don’t like the Eurostile font or something similar, it’s old.


 
Adamo
Sep 16, 2009 at 2:51 pm

I’m sold on the rationale behind it… Unfortunately however, without the explanation this logo means very little me.


 
Adamo
Sep 16, 2009 at 2:52 pm

*very little to me :P


 
EJSchultz
Sep 16, 2009 at 2:59 pm

Who is going to know to translate squares into binary without explanation? It’s a good graphic, but the context behind it it sux.


 
Surialism
Sep 16, 2009 at 3:10 pm

from the rationale, it seems that the company likes to confuse and trick the client, driving them to think this instead of that….

next..?


 
Surialism
Sep 16, 2009 at 3:11 pm

and wth is 80/20 supposed to mean?


 
Nasami
Sep 16, 2009 at 3:48 pm

too complex.


 
div
Sep 16, 2009 at 5:07 pm

Awesome Conceptual representation in binary format………… superb


 
Uzma
Sep 16, 2009 at 5:17 pm

huh, if u have to explain a logo…its not a good logo.Noone will get the binary code idea behind it, everyone,like me, will try to see if the dark squares are 20% but they are not and the confusion begins…..


 
nelaii
Sep 16, 2009 at 5:51 pm

A simple logo should not need a footnote explaining the meaning, it should work on its own.


 
Hayavadhan
Sep 16, 2009 at 6:08 pm

Looks more like a poster than a logo..and the 20 in black is distracting.thumbs down..


 
Jamie
Sep 16, 2009 at 10:41 pm

Love the logo & the concept. Although many people may not be *familiar* with binary code, I think everyone at least *knows of* binary code. At first glance of this logo, I assumed that was what the squares represented — even though I wouldn’t have been able to “translate” it myself from 0’s & 1’s to “80/20″.

I think it’s a strong logo that represents what the company does. Good colors & good visual balance. Only thing that bugs me is that the black “20″ is maybe a tad too heavy compared to the rest of the type & logo.


 
reyals
Sep 16, 2009 at 10:43 pm

I like it. even though not everyone is a computer geek, very little people even bother to look at the meaning behind a logo. that does not make symbolism any less important, it’s just a fact. cool logo. font works with it too.


 
Jamie
Sep 16, 2009 at 11:37 pm

The binary link seems a bit tenuous, especially since the company seems to be more rooted in financial consulting and databases than in IT/Programming. When I first saw the logo I also immediatly connected the graphic with the 80%, 20% idea rater than any connection with binary. Overall confusing…


 
Rachel
Sep 17, 2009 at 3:53 am

The link between binary code – financial planning – and “serious computing power” is tenuous. It’s clever, it’s charming, but its too deep. It would be smarter to just color 20% of the blocks. People would get that.


 
Surialism
Sep 17, 2009 at 7:58 pm

“People first guess that 20% of the squares are darkened, but that turns out to be false after counting them”

People dont guess or count… people ignore


 
Gail Gardner
Feb 15, 2017 at 8:58 pm

I don’t get how they think that represents 80 20 in binary. We used binary to talk to old computer equipment at IBM. To represent 80 20 I get this:

8 0 2 0
8 4 2 1 8 4 2 1 8 4 2 1 8 4 2 1
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

I don’t know if that will display correctly or get scrambled when I enter it.


 

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